Michael Mosley’s 5 reasons you’re putting on weight without knowing & how to lose it fast

Michael Mosley discusses health benefits of drinking water

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For those that exercise, eat well and follow a healthy lifestyle, but still put on weight, there may be a good reason for it. Diet expert Dr Michael Mosley, who created The Very Fast 800, The New 5:2 and The Way of Life, has revealed a few common reasons for the scales getting heavier and how that can be reversed. 

Portions are too big 

Dr Michael said: “You may be checking the calories per serving but not many people realised just how big the servings should be. 

“Think about cereal; the recommended serving size is considerably smaller than you may think with most brands recommending 40g, which is the equivalent of around three tablespoons. 

“Other portion sizes that many people forget to consider are sauces and dressings – again, the recommended serving size is around one tbsp, which isn’t quite as much as you may think. 

“Sauces are also packed with sugar and artificial flavours while being considerably high in calories.” 

Drinking your calories 

The expert explained: “Coffees, alcohol and fruit juices should all be factored into your calorie intake if you’re looking to lose weight.

“Often forgotten about, your daily latte is probably adding around 1,330 calories per week to your intake, which is around five and a half Mars bars.” 

Dr Michael has a practical tip: “Instead of a latte or a cappuccino, enjoy a black coffee with a splash of milk. 

“Or, if you’re just looking for a warm drink, try various herbal teas until you find the one right for you.” 

As for alcohol, Dr Michael said it is something that has to be “approached with caution”. 

“Many often forget how high in both calories and carbohydrates it can be.” 

The expert explained: “Coffees, alcohol and fruit juices should all be factored into your calorie intake if you’re looking to lose weight.

“Often forgotten about, your daily latte is probably adding around 1,330 calories per week to your intake, which is around five and a half Mars bars.” 

Dr Michael has a practical tip: “Instead of a latte or a cappuccino, enjoy a black coffee with a splash of milk. 

“Or, if you’re just looking for a warm drink, try various herbal teas until you find the one right for you.” 

As for alcohol, Dr Michael said it is something that has to be “approached with caution”. 

“Many often forget how high in both calories and carbohydrates it can be.” 

Regular snacking

Dr Michael revealed: “Nowadays, it’s uncommon for people to go more than two or three hours without consuming some form of calories whereas decades ago, years before the obesity pandemic, most adults went four to five hours between meals and got along just fine. 

“We now eat more than 20 percent of junk food than we did in 1980 and this is not coincidental with the increase of obesity rates worldwide. 

“Not only this, having two snacks a day can easily add an additional 400 calories to your day.” 

The expert shared a few ways in which you can cut back on snacking: hydrate, exercise, and eat protein-packed meals for long-lasting energy. 

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Not sleeping well 

Dr Michael quoted a recent meta-analysis, carried out by researchers at King’s College London and how it “found those that are sleep deprived consume an extra 385 calories, on average, each day”. 

“When added up over a week, this comes to 2,695 calories, which is around three portions of fish and chips. 

“Not only this but the calories you tend to consume when tired are generally unhealthy. 

“This is because the areas of the brain associated with reward become more active when deprived of sleep; you become more motivated to seek out unhealthy foods to give you quick energy,” he added. 

Feeling stressed

“Anxiety and stress can have a significant impact on both weight and blood sugars,” Dr Michael explained. 

“This is both through the direct impact that stress hormones, such as adrenaline and cortisol, have on the body, but also through the knock-on effect of coping with the stress itself. 

“We’re sure that you will have heard of, if not experienced, emotional or ‘comfort’ eating in your life.

“A 2006 study took a group of 272 female students and found that under normal circumstances, 80 percent of them made healthy food choices and when stressed, this was reduced to a mere 33 percent.” 

So what’s the solution? Dr Michael said: “A healthy Mediterranean-style diet could help; Med-style food has been recognised to improve gut health, in turn helping to ease anxiety and aid sleep.” 

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